SIDS DOCK and Global OTEC Resources announce partnership to develop and deploy Floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Technology Concept in small islands

SIDS DOCK and Global OTEC Resources announce partnership to develop and deploy Floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Technology Concept in small islands

07 July 2021, United Nations Headquarters, New York, U.S.A.: SIDS DOCK, the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) Sustainable Energy and Climate Resilience Organization, has signed an agreement with the United Kingdom (UK)-based Global OTEC Resources Limited, to collaborate on developing and deploying Floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Technology Concept in SIDS. The signing ceremony took place on Friday, 2 July 2021, by means of a virtual conference between representatives in Seychelles, Jamaica, Portugal and the United Kingdom.

Carbon Dioxide, Which Drives Climate Change, Reaches Highest Level In 4 Million Years

Carbon Dioxide, Which Drives Climate Change, Reaches Highest Level In 4 Million Years

This 2019 photo provided by NOAA shows the Mauna Loa Atmospheric Baseline Observatory in Hawaii. Measurements taken at the station in May 2021 revealed the highest monthly average of atmospheric carbon dioxide in human history.
Susan Cobb/NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratory

The amount of carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere reached 419 parts per million in May, its highest level in more than four million years, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced on Monday.

SIDS DOCK and GRID-Arendal announce strategic partnership for sustainable use and management of marine resources in small islands and low-lying developing countries

SIDS DOCK and GRID-Arendal announce strategic partnership for sustainable use and management of marine resources in small islands and low-lying developing countries Projects will support the economic and livelihoods systems of the populations and promote  nature-based solutions and technologies 19 May 2020, United Nations Headquarters, New York, U.S.A.: SIDS DOCK, the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) Sustainable Energy and Climate Resilience Organization, has signed an agreement with GRID-Arendal to collaborate on the promotion of nature-based solutions and technologies for the sustainable use and management of marine resources to support the economic and livelihoods systems of the populations of small islands and low-lying developing countries. The signing ceremony took place on Thursday, 14 May 2020, by means of a virtual conference between representatives in New York City and Norway, as a way to contain the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). H.E. Ambassador Ronald Jean Jumeau In signing on behalf of SIDS DOCK, His Excellency Mr. Ronald J. Jumeau, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Republic of Seychelles to the United Nations (UN) and Chair of the SIDS DOCK Executive Council, welcomed the partnership and commended GRID-Arendal for its strong support, noting that it has been a reliable and supportive partner since 2014. “This SIDS DOCK/GRID-Arendal partnership will provide us with a framework for cooperation to accelerate the synergistic deployment and monitoring of nature-based solutions to the challenges of ocean environmental management, rehabilitation of ecosystems, and the development of ocean-based renewable energy technologies in our SIDS DOCK Member Countries, and will also allow us to learn many lessons from Norway, as it too tries to achieve a low-carbon society,” he said, after affixing...

COVID-19, Blue Economy, and the Climate Change Agenda: The case of Seychelles

The human toll of the COVID-19 pandemic has been devastating. At the same time, measures to tackle the crisis have affected national economies and grounded global trade to a halt. Small Island Developing States (SIDS) such as the Seychelles are amongst the countries that have suffered some of the worst economic impacts of the outbreak. The current situation illustrates the global state of unpreparedness for a pandemic and points to similar inadequacies vis-à-vis climate change. Already reeling from the adverse consequences of climate change, the Seychelles’ emerging Blue Economy

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Action Plans in support of the National Vision “São Tomé e Príncipe 2030: the country we need to build”

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Action Plans in support of the National Vision “São Tomé e Príncipe 2030: the country we need to build”

Deadline: May – 11 – 2020 1. IntroductionThe Global Environment Facility (GEF) funded project “Strategic program to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency investments in the electricity sector of São Tomé and Príncipe” is implemented by UNIDO in partnership with the Ministry of Public Works, Infrastructure, Natural Resources and Environment (MOPIRNA) and other international partners (e.g. UNDP, WB/AFAP, AfDB). As a Small Island Developing State, STP faces specific challenges in relation to its size, remoteness from large markets, dependence on a small number of economic sectors, direct investment and remittances inflow, lack of resources and a significant trade deficit. Moreover, key sectors of the economy are highly vulnerable to natural, climate, and external economic shocks.  The GEF project contributes to the Vision 2030 “São Tomé e Príncipe 2030: the country we need to build”, which aims to transform the country into a climate-resilient and vibrant island hub for blue economy business, financial services and tourism, benefitting from the growing regional market of the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS). The GEF project is also part of the joint UN efforts to support the graduation of STP from the list of least developed countries (LDCs) by 2024.  Faced with a situation of constrained fiscal policy, the Government aims to create the conditions to allow the private sector to become an engine of growth, economic diversification and poverty reduction. The focus lies on improving the business climate, promoting foreign direct investment and improving key social and economic infrastructure, including energy.  The success of the Vision 2030 highly depends on a power sector reform and a transformational shift of the entire energy...
How Leaders of Sinking Countries Are Fighting Climate Change

How Leaders of Sinking Countries Are Fighting Climate Change

By Justin Worland | Photographs by Christopher Gregory for TIME Rising seas threaten to submerge Tuvalu, one of many island nations struggling with climate change. Christopher Gregory for TIME   The journey to the Fijian village of Vunidogoloa is arduous. It requires a flight across the Pacific to the nation’s remote international transit hub, a 140-mile connection on a rickety 19-seat plane to a smaller island, an hourlong drive past other rural villages and finally a short walk guided by a man with a machete to reach a ghost town forced into retreat by climate change and the rising seas that come with it. Once home to more than 100 people, Vunidogoloa has been overrun by the tropical forest. Plants cover the town square. The stench of rotting rodents wafts from abandoned homes, and salt water seeps up through the soil as far as 300 ft. from Natewa Bay. This Saturday morning in mid-May is warm and pleasant, but a few times a year, king tides inundate the village with knee-high waters; locals were forced to place precious possessions on tall surfaces and run for the hills. “All the rights of living,” says Sailosi Ramatu, the village’s administrator, “had been lost because of climate change.” And so, five years ago, Vunidogoloa was abandoned. The Fijian government built a new town about a mile up the hill at a cost of half a million dollars. Vunidogoloa is the first place in Fiji to relocate because of the effects of climate change, but it won’t be the last. Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama tells me he plans to move 40 Fijian villages in the...